Newton Infrared FAQ

Newton is a set of technologies developed by Apple to support a style of computing device called a personal digitial assistant (PDA). Several companies, in addition to Apple itself, have developed Newton products, including Sharp, Harris, Digital Ocean, Schlumberger and others.

Most Newton devices have a built-in point-to-point infrared communications port, capable of connecting to other Newtons, standalone IR adaptors, printers, consumer electronic devices and desktop computers. The capabilities of these ports vary with the Newton hardware and software model.

This FAQ attempts to answer common questions about the Newton infrared capabilities. It's home site is

http://www.pobox.com/~davida/newton/ir-faq.html

Please send any questions, comments, corrections or additions to the maintainer

davida@pobox.com

Index

Hardware and Protocols

H1. What protocol is the Newton IR port?
H2. What is the Sharp IR protocol (ASK)?
H3. What are the Apple extensions to Sharp's ASK protocol?
H4. What is the IrDA protocol?
H5. What IR hardware does the Newton use?

Compatibility

C1. Can the Newton talk to my Hewlett-Packard printer?
C2. Is there some way to connect to a desktop computer without a built-in IR port?

Printing

P1. Can I print to my IR-equiped printer?
P2. Is there some way to connect to a printer without a built-in IR port?
P3. Why is IrDA printing from my MP2000, MP2100 or eMate 300 so slow?
P4. Why is IrDA printing from my MP2000, MP2100 or eMate 300 so jaggy?
P5. Why is IrDA printing to my HP LaserJet 6MP so slow?

Remote Control with a Newton

R1. Can I use the Newton as a remote control for my VCR/TV/etc?
R2. So what if my device uses a different frequency?
R3. Can the Newton learn from my existing remote?
R4. Where's the package for my XXX brand XXX?
R5. Can I use the Newton Calendar application to automatically switch on my XXX?
R6. Can I write a program to control something from the Newton?
R7. Where are the control codes for my XXX brand XXX?
R8. So how does IR remote control work anyway?

Accessories

A1. Can I get a Sharp ASK IR to serial adaptor?
A2. Can I get a Sharp ASK IR to parallel adaptor?
A3. Can I get a Sharp ASK IR to Appletalk/Ethernet adaptor?
A4. Can I get an IrDA to serial adaptor?
A5. Can I get an IrDA to parallel adaptor?
A6. Can I get an IrDA to Appletalk/Ethernet adaptor?
A7. What about a multiprotocol adaptor?

Software

S1. Can I use the Newton IR port with Apple's Newton Connection Utilities?
S2. Can I use the Newton IR port with Landware's X-Port?
S3. Can I use the Newton IR port with Revelar's Connection Utilities?
S4. Can I use the Newton IR port with Steve Weyer's Sloup (Slurpee)?

Contributors

I didn't figure all this out myself -- numerous postings to comp.sys.newton.misc have been plundered to gather this information, as well as email from people who have asked new questions, provided new answers or clarified existing information.

These have included: Tom Deering, Lee Leonard, Emanuel Madariaga, Dick Campbell, John Schettino.


What protocol is the Newton IR port ?

This depends on what model Newton you have

Manufacturer Model Protocols
Apple MessagePad (H1000) Sharp ASK
MessagePad 100 (H1000) Sharp ASK
MessagePad 110 (Hxxxx) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
MessagePad 120 (Hxxxx) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
MessagePad 130 (H0196) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
MessagePad 2000 (H0149) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
IrDA
MessagePad 2100 (H0???) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
IrDA
eMate 300 (Hxxxx) Sharp ASK
Apple extensions
IrDA
Digital Ocean Tarpon none?
Seahorse none?
Harris Semiconductor SuperTech 2000 none?
Motorola Marco Sharp ASK
Schlumberger Health Terminal ?
Sharp PI-7000 Sharp ASK
PI-7100 Sharp ASK
Siemens Phone I ?
Phone II ?

What is the Sharp IR protocol (ASK)?

Sharp ASK is a protocol developed by Sharp for use with its range of electronic organisers. Sharp was a manufacturing partner for the Apple MessagePad and released a similar model at the same time. Apple adopted the Sharp protocol, and included an application in the Newton OS 1.x to connect via infrared to Sharp organisers and exchange data.

The protocol specification is available in HTML format.

Principal features are

Range 1 metre (3 feet)
Speed 9600 baud

What are the Apple protocol extensions?

Over the MessagePad product evolution, Apple extended the Sharp ASK protocol, making it substantially faster.

This must require some negotiation between devices on initialisation, although this is not documented.

Quoted maximum speeds for the various models are

MessagePad 9600 baud
MessagePad 100 9600 baud
MessagePad 110 38400 baud
MessagePad 120 38400 baud
MessagePad 130 38400 baud
MessagePad 2000 38400 baud
MessagePad 2100 38400 baud
eMate 300 38400 baud

What is the IrDA protocol?

The IrDA (Infrared Data Association) is an industry body developing standards for infrared data transfer.

Quoting from their corporate backgrounder ...

IrDA was established in 1993 to set and support hardware and software standards which create infrared communications links. The Association's charter is to create an interoperable, low-cost, low-power, half-duplex, serial data interconnection standard that supports a walk-up, point-to-point user model that is adaptable to a wide range of applications and devices. IrDA standards support a broad range of computing, communications, and consumer devices.
The IrDA standards are available via the web.

In summary, the IrDA has released two versions of the standard: 1.0 and 1.1. Version 1.1 specifies higher speed operations than 1.0, but is backward compatible.

The IrDA protocol family consists of several components: IrDA-SIR (serial infrared), IrDA-LMP (link management protocol), IrDA-LAP (link access protocol).

What IR hardware does the Newton use?

According the the Newton Q&A document from Apple ...

In the Apple MessagePad 100, 110, and 120, the Sharp ExpertPad, and the Motorola Marco, the IR transmitter/receiver is a Sharp Infrared Data Communication Unit model RY5BD11 connected to channel B of a Zilog 85C30 SCC. Data is communicated along a 500 KHz carrier frequency at 9600 or 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, odd parity. The IR hardware requires a minimum of 5 milliseconds settling time when transitioning between sending and receiving. Sharp's CE-IR2 wireless interface unit may be used to connect the Newton to MacOS or DOS machines, with the appropriate software.

The Newton supports four IR software data modes:
Sharp encoding, NewtIR protocol (specifications are NOT releaseable)
Sharp encoding, SharpIR protocol
Plain Serial
38 KHz encoding ("TV Remote Control")

Two interesting items emerge from this answer:

  1. this claims a maximum speed of 19200 baud (presumably for the later models) while specification sheets state that they can do 38400 baud.
  2. it mentions the NewtIR protocol and states that it's specifications are not available.

If anyone can clear up either of these issues, please contact the maintainer.


Can the Newton talk to my Hewlett-Packard printer?

If it's a DeskJet 340 or LaserJet 5M or 6MP, yes. See answer P1 below.

Otherwise, see answer P2 below.

Is there some way to connect to a desktop computer without a built-in IR port?

Yes - you can use an infrared to serial or parallel adaptor.

These are made by several companies, supporting either or both Sharp ASK and IrDA protocols.

See answers A1 and A1 below.


Can I print to my IR-equiped printer?

Maybe -- it depends on your printer, and your Newton model.

Most IR-capable printers support the IrDA protocols, rather than the Sharp ASK protocol. This means that they are only useable from the MP2000, MP2100 and eMate300 models.

For earlier MessagePads (120 with OS 2.0 and 130), I am currently aware of only one IR-printer option:

If anyone owning an OMP, 100, 110 or 120 with OS 1.3 has access to the O'Neil Outback, it'd be great to know whether it works when beamed ...

For those equipped with an MP2000, MP2100 or eMate 3000, the next problem is software: they come with driver software for only two IrDA printers: the Hewlett-Packard DeskJet 340 and the LaserJet 5MP.

The DeskJet needs the IR Adaptor Part #C3277A and the LaserJet needs Part #C2929A.

INSA Limited has announced Newton 2.x printer drivers for O'Neil Product Development's range of ruggedised mobile printers which support both serial and IrDA connections. Models supported are the microFlash 2, microFlash 3 and 8i. Speed is reported to be under 60 seconds for a busy 8"x11" page (on the 8i) and under 15 seconds for the microFlash models.

INSA also announced drivers for the Comtec range of printers. More details as I find them.

Otherwise, it has been reported that the LaserJet 6MP also works using the Newton 5MP driver. The 6MP IR adaptor is built into the printer casing. However, see question 5 below about reported speed problems with the 6MP.

It is possible that other printer models which can emulate the HP 5MP will work. I have not been able to test this -- has anyone else? I'd be especially interested in results of a connection using a parallel or serial port IrDA adaptor like the JetEye ...

It is also possible that all MessagePad and compatible models can print using a Sharp ASK adaptor, such as the Sharp CE-IR1 or the Actisys ACT-IR3S+. Has anyone succeeded doing this?

Is there some way to connect to a printer without a built-in IR port?

Maybe.

There's two parts to the problem: hardware and software.

The hardware part involves getting the printing signal from the Newton to the printer. There are several IR to serial/parallel adaptors available, with either or both of the Sharp ASK and IrDA protocols. Attaching one of these to the printer port will get you a hardware connection.

The next problem is the driver software. This has two components: tranferring the data correctly, and generating the correct printer language.

The Newton has a limited set of inbuilt printer drivers. You can also install more using the Newton Print Pack from Newton Inc (or Apple). These convert the Newton views into a specific printer language.

I'd be interested to hear of any success or failure in attempting to print from a Newton via either IrDA or beaming protocols. Please let me know how it works out if you try it.

Why is IrDA printing from my MP2000, MP2100 or eMate 300 so slow?

This could be one of two things: a software problem (for which there is a fix), or just the general nature of the IR link.

Apple has released a system update which vastly improves the printing speed using the HP drivers. It's available at

http://www.newton.apple.com/product_info/sw/printpack.html#Upgrades

If you have installed this update, and your printing is still too slow, it's probably because of the way the driver software works, and the speed of the IrDA connection (ie. there's nothing you can do about it).

The IrDA printer driver creates a bitmap image from the views that you want to print and encodes that in the language for a particular printer (in this case, Hewlett-Packard's PCL). Bitmaps are not a space-efficient way to describe images, and the resultant string is large.

The Newton IrDA port operates at the IrDA 1.0-compliant speed of 115kbps. While this is quite fast for serial ports, it's not that fast compared to a parallel port. Hence, transferring the encoded image is slow.

The combination of these factors results in slow printing.

Why is IrDA printing from my MP2000, MP2100 or eMate 300 so jaggy?

Because the Newton uses a bitmapped screen and the translation of these bitmaps to the higher resolution of the printer results in jagged edges in the printed image.

There's little that can be done about this, since the Newton doesn't support stroke fonts. It's possible that future printer drivers could attempt to translate Newton fonts into PostScript or TrueType equivalents, but that wouldn't work for Casual, for example.

Why is IrDA printing to my HP LaserJet 6MP so slow?

Well, see question 3 above for a general answer, but it seems the 6MP might not perform its best when using the 5MP driver included with the Newton OS.

The following message is from comp.os.newton.misc (trimmed):

From: "Steven Falk" <sfalk@usa.net> Newsgroups: comp.sys.newton.misc Subject: Re: Ir Printing Slow Date: Fri, 8 Aug 1997 09:05:17 -0700 I've had the same problem on a 6MP. That is not the case with the 5MP, it prints VERY fast. I'm thinking of giving my brand new 6MP to my assistant and taking his old 5MP which works great with the Newton. Any news on Newton coming out with an updated printer driver for the 6MP? -- Steven Falk sfalk@usa.net 14390 Elva Avenue Saratoga, CA 95070 (408)867-3434 - Home (408)872-0563 - Work (408)868-0345 - Fax (408)309-0512 - Cellular "If you can Dream it, you can Do it" -- Walt Disney

Can I use the Newton as a remote control for my VCR/TV/etc?

Maybe.

Consumer IR remote controls normally use one of two carrier modulation frequencies: about 38kHz or about 56kHz. Which one is used depends on the manufacturer and model of your device.

All Newtons can generate IR remote control pulses using a 38kHz carrier. If your TV (or whatever) doesn't use roughly this frequency, then it is unlikely you will be able to reliably control it with current Newtons.

You may have some success using a shorter range: it depends upon the filtering used by the device to cut out stray signals. Try holding the Newton closer to the TV!

See the following answers for details of devices and models which are known to work.

So what if my device uses a different frequency?

Tell Newton Inc that you need this feature!

The IR chipset on all Newtons supports a software controllable modulation divisor. Before Newton OS 2.1 there was nothing in the ROMs that allowed access to the divisor. With 2.1, while there is no API to changing the divisor, it is patchable at the driver level.

To get IR control packages that support 56.8kHz devices (like cable boxes and some TVs, VCRs, etc) -- tell Newton Inc that the modulation divisor needs to be settable via a ROM API.

The Newton Inc web pages suggest webmaster@newton.apple.com as the appropriate address for all product suggestions and feedback. You might want to say something like

I have a insert your device type here that does not
work with the current Newton IR remote control.  I
believe this is because the carrier modulation
frequency is fixed at 38kHz, and my device requires
a frequency of 56.8kHz.

Would you please consider making the carrier modulation
frequency divisor available in the Newton OS API in the
next Newton OS release?
	  

Can the Newton learn from my existing remote?

No.

All Newton models have a filter over the IR receiving diode to prevent interference from other IR sources when receiving a beamed transmission. Unfortunately, this filter prevents the 38kHz frequency used by most remote controls from being received.

Where's the package for my XXX brand XXX?

Depends on what device and model you want. Here's a list of some programs.

Manufacturer Device Model Package Newton OS
Emerson VCR ? tvpad-0.9.sit 1.x
JVC Amp, CD, Tape ? ShowMate 1.x, 2.x
Magnavox TV ? tvpad-0.9.sit 1.x
Mitsubishi TV ? tvpad-0.9.sit 1.x
Panasonic Amp, Tuner, CD, TV, VCR, Tape ? ShowMate 1.x, 2.x
RCA Satellite decoder DSS Does not work with Newtons: needs 59kHz carrier
Sony TV, CD, tape, Amp, Tuner sonyremote-1.01.sit 1.x
Amp, Tuner, CD, DAT, Tape, Phono, TC, VCR, Laser Disc showtime.sit 1.x
TV ? tvpad-0.9.sit 1.x
VCR SLV-E7 SonyMeeting 2.x
Amp, Tuner, CD, DAT, TV, VCR, TAP, Phono, Laser disc, Camera ShowMate 1.x, 2.x

Can I use the Newton Calendar application to automatically switch on my XXX?

Maybe.

If you have a Sony, try the SonyMeeting package.

Can I write a program to control something from the Newton?

Yes.

The Newton Toolkit provides an API for remote control programming, documented in the Communications Reference manual and in the Newton Q&A

Steve Weyer's Newt can also use this API.

NSBasic can also generate IR remote control codes: see their technical note on the subject.

Where are the control codes for my XXX brand XXX?

A good list can be found at

ftp://nada.kth.se:home/home/d89-bga/hp/remote/remotes/

So how does Newton IR remote control work anyway?

It's a long story ...

IR remote control uses codes, represented by different time periods of IR pulses -- like morse code with dots and dashes. Each of the pulses in a code lasts for a couple of hundreths of a second.

When the remote is sending a pulse, the IR LED is actually like a strobe light flashing thousands of times a second. This is done so that the sensor on the TV can tell the difference between light coming from a remote control and sunlight shining through the leaves of a tree.

The Newton's remote control IR modulation is fixed at 38kHz. Newton Inc does not give developers any method of changing the modulation. This is too bad because about half of the TVs and VCRs coming from Japan and almost all of the cable and satellite boxes are looking for a modulation of around 56kHz. With some devices having the wrong modulation means that they will only work when the Newton is held about 3 feet away from the set. With other devices like cable boxes, it just won't work at all.

Whether a device which uses a different frequency will work with the Newton depends upon their filtering of stray signals: less stringent filtering will allow the Newton's signal through, although possibly from an unusably short range.

The IR chipset on all the MessagePads supports a software controllable modulation divisor. Before Newton OS 2.1 there was nothing in the ROMs that allowed access to the divisor. With 2.1, while there is no API to chnging the divisor, it IS patchable at the driver le7el. Ho°ffudly, in the future this willbe accessable thrugh an OS APi fun{tinn.

Š  <¯dl>m à


Can I get#a Sqarp ASK IR to serial adaptor?

à@
Yes. -

Sharp ASK IR to RS-232 adaptors0are made by at least dhree companies. ToÀmy knowledge they do not wlrk at the furl 38.4kbps speed of the lateR model Newtonó, b7t it iS still possible to establish a connection at 9600 baud, at least.

Actisys ACT-IR200L
The Actisys ACT-IR200L is a dual-modetSharp ASK/IrDA 1.0 serial adaptor.• It comes Géth a DB9 female conŽector `nd used the DC poweÖ %available from the sfrial port. 

Available AS« connection speeds are 9600 and 19200 baud at a range of 1 metre (3 feet).

Actisys ACT-IR3S+
The Actisys ACT-IR3S+ is a comâined unit wi^hÀboth parallel and serial interfaces.Í

It supports 19.2kbps and 9600bps speeds, but£I'm vot sure whether the Newton can utilise the 19.2k speed.

Unlike the Sharp, it does not automatically power off when powered from thå DC adaptor (according to their8web page).

˜sprong>Enfour!IR Pod

The Enfour IR º Pod is designed especially for the Newton, and is compatible with all existing models from Apple.

The unit is small, with no batteries or AC adaptor required, since it takes its power from the serial port. The connector is a MiniDIN-8 (Mac serial style), and the cable approx 1.5m long.

The announced price of the unit is US$70 (without volume discounts).

These guys are kindly sending me one of these units, so I'll have some more comments/description once it arrives.

Sharp CE-IR2
The Sharp CE-IR2 Wireless Interface is a small desktop unit designed for Sharp's electronic organiser range. It has a female 25 pin RS-232 socket for serial connection to a desktop computer, and a DC power socket for 6VDC power input (use adaptor P/N EA-11E). It can also be powered by 4 AA batteries.

The only problem with this unit is that there is a 6 minute idle timeout with automatic shutoff, regardless of whether it is running on battery or wall power.

Sharp CE-IR4
The CE-IR4 is physically similar to the CE-IR2, and has the same connectors.

The main difference between the two units is that the CE-IR4 supports both ASK and IrDA protocols. The documentation claims ASK mode speeds of 9600 and 19.2kbps.

Unlike the the CE-IR2, the 6 minute timeout is disabled when the DC adaptor is used.

See A7 for more information.

Can I get a Sharp ASK IR to parallel adaptor?

Yes.

Sharp ASK IR to Centronics parallel adaptors are made by at least two companies.

Sharp CE-IR1
The Sharp CE-IR1 Wireless Interface is a small desktop unit designed for Sharp's electronic organiser range.

I've never seen one of these devices -- anyone have more information?

Actisys ACT-IR3S+
The Actisys ACT-IR3S+ is a combined unit with both parallel and serial interfaces.

It supports 19.2kbps and 9600bps speeds, but I'm not sure whether the Newton can utilise the 19.2k speed.

Unlike the Sharp, it does not automatically power off when powered from the DC adaptor.

Can I get a Sharp ASK IR to Appletalk/Ethernet adaptor?

No.

Can I get an IrDA to serial adaptor?

Yes.

Actisys ACT-IR200L
The Actisys ACT-IR200L is a dual-mode Sharp ASK/IrDA 1.0 serial adaptor. It comes with a DB9 female connector and used the DC power available from the serial port.

Available IrDA connection speeds are 9.6, 19.2, 38,4, 57.6 and 115.2k bps at a range of 2 metres (6 feet).

Entended Systems JetEye
The Extended Systems JetEye adaptors are a range of IrDA adaptors. The ESI-9680 provides connection to a standard RS-232 9 or 25 pin serial port.

Puma Technology Serial IR Adaptor
Puma Technology sells a serial IrDA adaptor , with a list price of US$79.95

Sharp CE-IR4
The Sharp CE-IR4 Wireless Interface is a small desktop unit designed for Sharp's electronic organiser range. It has a female 25 pin RS-232 socket for serial connection to a desktop computer, and a DC power socket for 6VDC power input (use adaptor P/N EA-11E). It can also be powered by 4 AA batteries.

This unit supports both IrDA 1.0 (up to 115.2Kbps) and Sharp's ASK protocol.

See A7 for more information.

Can I get an IrDA to parallel adaptor?

Yes.

Actisys ACT-IR100
The Actisys ACT-IR100 range has two units: the ACT-IR100X and the ACT-IR100M.

The 100M supports IrDA 1.0 connection speeds are 9.6, 19.2, 38,4, 57.6 and 115.2k bps at a range of 1 metre (3 feet). It has two Centronics 36pin connectors to operate in pass-through mode allowing wired connection to a desktop computer in addition to the wireless link.

The 100X supports IrDA 1.0 connection speeds are 9.6, 19.2, 38,4, 57.6 and 115.2k bps at a range of 1 metre (3 feet). It has a single DB25 female connector for connection to a standard PC printer cable.

I'm not certain, but these devices also claim (in one place on their web page) to also support Sharp ASK. Can anyone clarify this?

Entended Systems JetEye
The Extended Systems JetEye adaptors are a range of IrDA adaptors. The ESI-9910, ESI-9911, and ESI-9580 provide connection to a standard Centronics parallel printer port.

Puma Technology Parallel IR Adaptor
Puma Technology sells a parallel IrDA adaptor , with a list price of US$152.00

Can I get an IrDA to Appletalk/Ethernet adaptor?

Yes.

Entended Systems JetEye
The Extended Systems JetEye adaptors are a range of IrDA adaptors.
  • The ESI-9900 attaches to a 10base-2 or 10base-T ethernet.
  • The ESI-9910 attaches to a 10base-2 or 10base-T ethernet and has a connection for a local parallel printer.
  • The ESI-9911 attaches to a UTP or STP TokenRing network at either 4 or 16Mbps with a local parallel printer port.

Hewlett-Packard NetBeamIR
The HP NetBeamIR Access Point provides an IrDA connection to a 10base-2 or 10baseT Ethernet network. It is IrDA 1.1 compliant, with speeds of 115.2k, 1Mbps or 4Mbps available.

Hewlett-Packard Part #J2964A NetBeamIR Infrared Access Point.

What about a multiprotocol adaptor?

There are two multi-protocol adaptors that I know of:

Actisys ACT-IR200L
The Actisys ACT-IR200L is a dual-mode Sharp ASK/IrDA 1.0 serial adaptor. It comes with a DB9 female connector and used the DC power available from the serial port.

Available IrDA connection speeds are 9.6, 19.2, 38,4, 57.6 and 115.2k bps at a range of 2 metres (6 feet). Available ASK connection speeds are 9.6 adn 19.2k bps at a range of 1 metre (3 feet).

Sharp CE-IR4
The Sharp CE-IR4 Wireless Interface is a small desktop unit designed for Sharp's electronic organiser range. It has a female 25 pin RS-232 socket for serial connection to a desktop computer, and a DC power socket for 6VDC power input (use adaptor P/N EA-11E). It can also be powered by 4 AA batteries.

The documentation claims the following speeds

Sharp 8600 & 9000 series organisers 9600bps
Other ASK mode devices 9600 - 19.2Kbps
Sharp ZR-5000 K-PDA up to 115.2Kbps
Other IrDA mode devices 9600 - 115.2Kbps

It has a stated operating range of between 10 and 50 cm using infrared with a peak frequency between 850 and 1050nm.

The serial connection uses 8 data bits, odd parity and 1 stop bit. RTS (pin 4) is used to toggle between IrDA and ASK modes.


Can I use the Newton IR port with Apple's Newton Connection Utilities?

No.

Can I use the Newton IR port with Landware's X-Port?

No.

Here's an excerpt from the mail I received from Landware ...

To: davida@pobox.com
Subject: Re: IR support in X-Port
From: LandWare Support 
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 13:28:05 -0500

>could you tell me whether X-Port supports connections to the desktop
>using either the older Sharp IR or IrDA protocols?  or if not, is
>this planned?

Sorry but that is not supported.  At this time XPort only supports
Serial and AppleTalk.  There are no plans for that in the immediate
future, but if anything does become available, we will post details to
our web site.  We appreciate your interest in Landware.

LandWare, Inc.
Voice: (201) 261-7944 Fax: (201) 261-7949
PO Box 25, Oradell, NJ 07649, USA
http://www.landware.com
support@landware.com

Bringing innovative software to:
Newton * Macintosh * Pilot * Windows CE
+--------------------------------------+
	

Can I use the Newton IR port with Revelar's Connection Utilities?

No.

Here's an excerpt from the mail I received from Landware ...

To: davida@pobox.com
Subject: Re: support for IR in RCU
From: "Van C. Evans" 
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 17:15:42 +0000

David Arnold wrote:

> can you clarify RCU's support for this?  can it use the IR port to
> connect to the desktop?  if not, are you considering adding it?

For over a year now we have been waiting for Apple to release to us
the PDIL protocols. This will enable us to write directly to the built
in Dock or Connection app on the Newton. doing so would not only
eliminate the need for a separate newton connection app which takes us
space, but also would give us the builtin transports of AppleTalk, IR,
etc.

Apple released a set buggy set of the PDILs last Spring, but we are
still waiting for stable final versions. Until then, we will not be
able to support AppleTalk nor IR.

Thanks,

Van Evans
Revelar Software
Salt Lake City, Utah
801-278-7102 Voice
801-274-1294 Fax
800-669-5191 Sales

Web: http://www.revelar.com
FTP: ftp://ftp.revelar.com

Makers of RCU, Notable!, Accordian, Punch Box, and TaxPro for the
Newton.
	

Can I use the Newton IR port with Steve Weyer's Sloup (Slurpee)?

Soon!

The latest beta of Sloup has support for using Sharp ASK connections between the host and the Newton. Unlike the serial and ADSP however, the IR option requires a driver program on the desktop.

Steve is also working on IrDA support. Look for more details soon.


This is $Revision: 1.17 $ updated $Date: 1998/02/24 13:00:04 $